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Carson Wentz placed on reserve/COVID-19 list

The former Eagles QB’s status is worth monitoring.

Indianapolis Colts Training Camp Photo by Justin Casterline/Getty Images

Carson Wentz’s first summer in Indianapolis has gotten off to a rough start. Wentz had foot surgery earlier this month, something that seemed to put him in danger of missing the start of the season. Wentz was scheduled to return to full-team practice today, but has now been placed on the Reserve/COVID-19 list:

Wentz’s vaccination status could have the start of his 2021 season in jeopardy once again. Brandon Lee Gowton laid out the ramifications of Wentz missing time for COVID-related reasons last month after the former Eagles quarterback was spotted wearing a mask during a press conference, something non-vaccinated players are required to do. As we know, the Eagles need Wentz to play at least 75 percent of the Colts’ snaps this season or at least 70 percent of the snaps and Indy makes the playoffs to get the Colts’ first-round pick in 2022 (it would otherwise convey as a second).

If Wentz is indeed unvaccinated, it could affect his preparation leading up to Week 1. Here are the NFL’s protocols regarding positive COVID tests for unvaccinated players:

If an unvaccinated person tests positive, the protocols from 2020 will remain in effect. The person will be isolated for a period of 10 days and will then be permitted to return to duty if asymptomatic. Unvaccinated individuals will continue to be subject to a five-day quarantine period if they have close contact with an infected individual.

A COVID outbreak for a given team could result in them forfeiting a game in 2021. It’s serious on many, many levels.

With the Colts’ Week 1 matchup with the Seahawks 13 days away, this could put a dent in the team’s preparation for Seattle.

For reference, the NFL the said last week that 93 percent of players are vaccinated.

UPDATE:

(Relatively) good news for the Colts: it looks like Wentz himself didn’t test positive, meaning he could return to practice sooner rather than later: