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Eagles Week 5 fantasy football outlook

The Jets sans Darnold could be in for a rough game

Philadelphia Eagles v Green Bay Packers Photo by Quinn Harris/Getty Images

After taking the short week off, we’re back with some more Eagles fantasy football content for ya! In week 4, we saw the Birds fly high at Lambeau Field and escape relatively unscathed. In this week’s matchup, the Jets will be without their leader because he isn’t willing to risk death for his team like Carson Wentz would for the Eagles. If there is any game you will be rewarded for playing some Eagles, this should be it.

Carson Wentz, Quarterback (Week 3: Start, Result: QB9)

Carson hasn’t been throwing the ball as much as some would like, but he’s been a remarkably good passer so far in 2019 and should absolutely feast against New York. Wentz is a must-start in all formats and makes for a great DFS GPP option this week.

Verdict: START

Alshon Jeffery, Wide Receiver (Week 3: Sit, Result: N/A - Injury)

To put it bluntly, Alshon has not been the guy the team needs him to be this year, but hopefully, that will all change against the Jets. Jeffery has a tasty matchup against Darryl Roberts, who is recovering from an ankle injury. Will this be the game Jeffery steps up big time? We’ll see, but I’d bet on it.

Verdict: START

DeSean Jackson, Wide Receiver (Week 3: Sit, Result: N/A - Injury)

Jackson was ruled out for Sunday’s game.

Verdict: SIT

Nelson Agholor, Wide Receiver (Week 3: Start, Result: WR9)

Agholor is on pace for 672 yards and 12 TDs, which is a pretty bogus stat line if I’m being honest. Something’s gotta give here, and the smart money is on Agholor’s touchdown pace slowing down. Either way, until a healthy DeSean Jackson returns, Agholor makes for a solid FLEX play.

Verdict: START

Mack Hollins, Wide Receiver (Week 3: Sit, Result: WR47)

Would you believe Mack Hollins has been targeted 17 times this year? While 4.3 targets per game isn’t an ideal number for a fantasy WR, it’s certainly enough to monitor the young wideout. If he starts to catch the ball and make some plays, we might have to start considering picking him up in deeper leagues, but for now, he’s best left adrift.

Verdict: SIT

J.J. Arcega-Whiteside, Wide Receiver (Week 3: Sit, Result: WR95)

On the year JJAW has two catches and one historic drop on just six targets and to make matters worse, he’s now apparently a bust.

Joking aside, the production hasn’t been high, and you definitely should not even consider starting him in fantasy football until 2020.

Verdict: SIT

Zach Ertz, Tight End (Week 3: Start, Result: TE12)

So far, in 2019, Zach Ertz is just the eighth-highest scoring tight end, which certainly has owners frustrated with him. While the Jets have not really been tested from the TE position yet this season, it needs to be noted that they’ve done a pretty good job at locking up the guys they have played against. Ertz is in play as a back-end TE1 this week.

Verdict: START

Dallas Goedert, Tight End (Week 3: Sit, Result: TE59)

With just six targets on the season, the only Dallas I’ll root for has simply not been thrown to enough. It is promising, however, that Goedert has the 9th highest aDOT in the league among TEs. If anything were to happen to Ertz, Goedert would instantly become a high-upside TE1, but for now, he will have to wait his turn. You can keep an eye on his numbers, but avoid starting him.

Verdict: SIT

Jordan Howard, Running Back (Week 3: Sit, Result: RB33)

Through 4 weeks, Howard has undoubtedly been the best back on the team, and his fantasy numbers show precisely that. Clocking in as the 19th highest scoring running back, Howard has been among the best in the league in regards to fantasy points generated per snap played with 0.58, which is the most in the league (tied with Dalvin Cook). One thing that keeps me interested in the former Bear is his usage in the red zone; through four games, Howard has carried the ball five times within the five-yard line and gotten touchdowns on three of them. Howard should be the lead back and the bruiser moving forward and will be fantasy playable in all formats.

Verdict: START

Miles Sanders, Running Back (Week 3: Sit, Result: RB20)

If I told you in August that Sanders would be within 5 fantasy points of players such as Kenyan Drake, Tarik Cohen, Duke Johnson Jr., Sony Michel, and Matt Breida after 4 games, you probably would have been pleased to hear it. Well, unfortunately for Sanders, he is only in the company of these other mid-level running backs because all of them have severely underperformed to start the season. Until Sanders both get consistent touches and makes regular plays, he’s not trustable. He’s worth stashing in deeper formats, but in your standard leagues, barring an injury to Jordan Howard, it’s hard to believe he’ll be a reliable option for much for the rest of the season.

Verdict: SIT

Darren Sproles, Running Back (Week 3: Sit, Result: RB73)

It’s probably best to avoid Sproles in any and all formats for the rest of time. He’s been a great player and will likely make a handful of splash plays throughout the remainder of the season, but he simply does not get the touches required to be a fantasy running back.Verdict: SIT

Corey Clement, Running Back (Week 3: Sit, Result: N/A)

Clement hasn’t logged a single offensive touch this season.

Verdict: SIT

Jake Elliott, Kicker (Week 3: Sit, Result: K17)

Currently sitting as the 10th highest scoring fantasy kicker, Elliott has been a little underwhelming so far this year. While I am not comfortable signing off on him for the rest of the year, a blowout game for Philadelphia should reward any Elliott owners who have been patient.

Verdict: START

Eagles Defense & Special Teams (Week 3: Sit, Result: DST25)

Although the defensive line is yet to have a signature game in the box scores, the pressure they’ve been generated has not gone unnoticed. The unit is among the top ten defenses in terms of pressure generated, and against the hapless Jets, one would think this unit is going to find it’s way home. If there was ever a week to start this unit, it’s this one.

Verdict: START

As always, this article is generally giving guidance to players in standard-sized, PPR leagues. but feel free to ask questions regarding your specific situation in the comments below or feel free to tweet them my way (@LeeSifford).