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Eagles players didn’t mind the ‘boos’, so you shouldn’t either

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Was it really that surprising given the first-half performance, that Philly fans let out a few jeers heading into halftime? It shouldn’t be.

NFL: Atlanta Falcons at Philadelphia Eagles Bill Streicher-USA TODAY Sports

During one particular preseason edition of the “Nick Foles what are you doing!?” Show, I sat there screaming at my TV when my Dad looked at me and laughed, “that’s pretty aggressive snark for a preseason game”.

But that’s the thing, whether it’s the preseason or the playoffs, Eagles fans expect a good performance — and when the product on the field isn’t good, we often let the team know. (Even if it’s from our living rooms, and far from the coaches ears.)

It might be a bit surprising to some of the new guys in the building — or outside media members —, but any team vet will tell you that Eagles fans love hard, and they might support you in good times and bad, but in the bad times they are going to let you hear it.

It’s something Brent Celek celebrated in his retirement letter to Eagles fans:

“In most cities if the team isn’t good they just don’t go to the game. In Philly they all still go to the game; they just “boo” the whole time. I love it. It shows their passion. They show up rain or shine and tell you exactly how they feel. Over time I have grown to love and respect that. It’s why I constantly said in interviews that the only thing that mattered to me is winning the Super Bowl. I appreciate all the energy and passion the great Philly fans brought every week.”

Moreso than being expected — especially given the actual offensive performance against the Falcons on Thursday, particularly in the first half — team leader Malcolm Jenkins explained why he was happy to hear the fans jeers heading into the half.

A lot has been made this offseason about how the team would handle things as reigning Super Bowl Champions; whether they would rest on their laurels or still be motivated to go for another ring. Jenkins’ admission is that the fans are what will ultimately keep them humble and keep them pushing to be even better than they were the day before.

“We all we got, we all we need.”

And that “we” includes the players on the field, the coaches on the sidelines, and the fans in the stands and watching from home. Sure, we may “boo” a time or two, but it’s really for the betterment of the team — and who can be mad at that?