clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile

Filed under:

Doug Pederson has a new method for Eagles training camp practice

Doug is changing things up.

NFL: Philadelphia Eagles-Minicamp Bill Streicher-USA TODAY Sports

The second Philadelphia Eagles training camp of the Doug Pederson era will share similarities to the first. Back in June, Pederson confirmed the team will go through live tackling sessions once again this summer.

There will also be some differences. One notable change is how the team conducts practice. Pederson said as much during an interview earlier this offseason, via NJ.com:

However, this year for the first time, Pederson plans on splitting the various offensive and defensive units among the several practice fields with coordinators coaching the starters and position coaches and assistants spending time with the reserve groups. All in the name of development.

"You saw us split the field this spring," Pederson said following June's mandatory minicamp. "Which was new. and it helps develop our younger guys, and it helps develop our younger coaches. The coaching staffs are split, too.

"So, the likes of Eugene Chung, Press Taylor, Dino Vasso, Phillip Daniels, they can go work with the 2's and 3's while the actual position coaches can stay with the 1's, with their guys. The design there is create the competition, fun, energy, but at the same time develop."

Indeed, the Eagles did practice on two separate fields during OTAs and minicamp this spring. This new format helps maximize limited practice time for players and coaches alike.

“The coaches have done a great job of setting up practice to where we get so many more reps,” Eagles wide receiver Marcus Johnson told BGN Radio on SportsRadio 94WIP. “Whether with you’re the ones, the twos, the threes, etc. They’ve done a great job of getting us consistent reps.”

Chip Kelly took maximizing practice reps to an extreme by practicing at a breakneck rate. Pederson’s method seems like a compromise between Andy Reid’s slow-paced practices and Kelly’s preference.

Now, why should you care about any of this? Maybe you shouldn’t. We’re talkin’ bout practice here, after all. But at the very least these changes show Pederson is willing to adapt and not be so stuck in his Reid-influenced ways, which is nice.