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Eagles News: Pierre Garcon would help, but isn’t the answer

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Eagles news and notes for 2/11.

Philadelphia Eagles v Washington Redskins Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images

Pierre Garcon named as potential Eagles target, which doesn't make much sense - Philly Voice

As you can see from his numbers above, Garcon has averaged a modest 12.5 yards per catch over his career. He also has never once scored more than six touchdowns in any season. Garcon's role is pretty well established at this point in his career. He is a good possession receiver who is not going to give you much in the way of big plays.

When you look at the Eagles' receivers and ask, "What kind of receiver could they use," one correct answer could be, "Literally anything," and you wouldn't get much of an argument from me. There's no question that Garcon would be an upgrade, but that is about as low a bar as one could set.

However, if there's one thing the Eagles are at least close to having, that would be possession receivers who are not going to, you know, give you much in the way of big plays. The Eagles already have those kinds of guys in Jordan Matthews and Zach Ertz, although "possession receiver" is perhaps a generous title for a guy who drops as many passes as Matthews.

Players like Matthews, Ertz, and whatever running backs are on the roster in 2017 would benefit from a player who is a threat to make plays down the field. Another receiver who can make catches in short to intermediate areas of the field is not going to stop opposing safeties from camping out near the line of scrimmage, like they did in 2016.

Eagles should think twice about pulling resources from offensive line - ESPN

It's also hard to deny that the Eagles are in a transitional phase. Executive vice president of football operations Howie Roseman has made it clear that they're taking the long view when it comes to this team. They're less interested in going 10-6 in the here and now as they are in building a powerhouse that can snatch a first-round bye and legitimately compete for championships down the line. If you're looking big picture, perhaps you're more willing to make moves -- or even requests -- that you normally wouldn't if solely consumed with the upcoming season.

There's also danger in getting too ahead of yourself. Peters and Kelce represent two-fifths of your starting offensive line and, beyond that, are two structural pillars inside that locker room. This is a business and veterans like Peters understand that. At the same time, when you're asked to take a pay cut, no matter how nicely, the message it sends is that the organization has put a lower value on you. That doesn't guarantee sour feelings will follow, but it opens up the possibility.

As for the idea of parting with Kelce: He had a rocky 2015 and struggled over the first half of this past season, but the consensus is that he finished the year in a strong fashion. Beyond the obvious athleticism that he brings (he can get to the second level as well as anybody), Kelce is a cerebral player and a good asset to have when trying to identify opposing looks presnap. In that way, he was a useful ally to Carson Wentz in the quarterback's first year.

2017 Draft Defined By Depth - MMQB

So the good news for everyone five days after the Super Bowl: The way the 32 teams see it, the 2017 class they’re evaluating now is pretty damn close to what the 2014 group was going into the process.

“Depth-wise, it’s great,” said one AFC executive. “What I like about it is, if we do our job and have faith in our scouts, we can get starters into the fifth round.”

“It’s a very good draft,” added a top personnel executive for an NFC team. “If you’re in a position like Cleveland is with a lot of picks—and you still gotta pick the right guys—but it’s an excellent draft. Very deep across the board.”

John Lynch's daughter: 49ers are 'horrible' - NFL.com

Speaking with NFL Network's Michael Silver on Thursday after his introductory press conference, 49ers GM John Lynch told the story of his 9-year-old daughter getting upset after his hire.

"I think the toughest one -- I haven't told this yet to the media -- all my kids took it really well," Lynch said. "They were shocked but they took it really well. My 9-year-old started bawling, and she's not that girl. She's the one that was always happy. And she was crying, and I said, 'What's wrong Leah? Are you afraid? Is there some nervous anxiety about moving?' And she said, 'No daddy,' and she was sobbing. And I said, 'What's wrong?' And she said, 'The 49ers are horrible.' So, I said, 'Well, I think that's why they hired your daddy."