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Eagles vs. Cowboys, Winners and Losers: Philadelphia's offense sucks

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Not many winners this week.

James Lang-USA TODAY Sports

Despite losing to the Atlanta Falcons in Week 1, the Philadelphia Eagles found themselves in a promising situation going into Week 2. A win over the division rival Dallas Cowboys would give the Eagles an early lead in the NFC East with a win over the one team most likely to challenge them for the division crown.

The Eagles failed to capitalize on the opportunity, and instead put together one of the sloppiest and most disjointed performances in recent team history. Though the 20-10 score seemed close, the Eagles offense wasn't able to get anything going against a Dallas defense missing several key pieces.

Let's take a look at who performed well against the Cowboys, and who should be feeling the heat this week in Philadelphia:

Winners

Malcolm Jenkins: In a game where not much went right, safety Malcolm Jenkins was a bright spot. He was tied for the team lead with seven tackles, and was back to his playmaking self.

In the second quarter, Jenkins recovered a backwards pass that was later ruled an incompletion, and in the third quarter he recovered a fumble forced by Byron Maxwell. This is now two games in a row Jenkins has been a bright spot in an otherwise discouraging loss.

Honorable Mention - No one: The Eagles defense was able to hold the Cowboys to 20 points... but the Cowboys were missing their starting quarterback for much of the game, and were also without a starting defensive end, a starting cornerback and, oh yeah, Dez Bryant. Meanwhile quarterback Sam Bradford led the Eagles in rushing - with nine yards.

Sorry, but there are really no true winners in this one.

Losers

Eagles linebackers: The Eagles were already thin at linebacker, and Sunday's loss didn't help much. Both Kiko Alonso and Mychal Kendricks exited the game with injuries, meaning rookie Jordan Hicks manned the middle next to DeMeco Ryans. And while Hicks did have a sack-fumble on Tony Romo, the Eagles certainly weren't envisioning Hicks playing this many snaps so early in the year.

Speaking of Ryans, the veteran may be starting to show his age. While he had a nice goal line deflection on third down in the first quarter, he was the one who put the defense in a goal-line situation in the first place. He gave up a near-touchdown to Gavin Escobar that put the Cowboys on the one yard line.

DeMarco Murray: In his first game against his old team, Murray wasn't able to get anything going on the ground. The NFL's reigning rushing champ mustered only two yards on 13 carries. Murray now has an unreal 10 yards on 22 attempts this season. Even the biggest Eagles haters wouldn't have predicted this kind of output through two games.

Sam Bradford: When an offense struggles, the first scapegoat is usually the quarterback. And while every phase of the offense shoulders some of the blame for Sunday's loss, Bradford is responsible for plenty. He finished the night 22-of-37 for 224 yards, one touchdown and two interceptions.

And while those numbers aren't ideal, the reality is even worse. Bradford's touchdown came late in the fourth quarter, and one of his two interceptions occurred in the end zone. It's still early, but if Bradford wants to stay in Philly, he will simply need to do better.

The offensive line: The Eagles offense is built around the run. Without a strong ground game, the Eagles become the one-dimensional team we've seen over the last two weeks. Much of the reason for the offense's poor play Sunday was a result of the offensive line's ineffectiveness, and that starts with the o-line.

For the second straight week, the line missed blocks and was unable to get to the second level. Center Jason Kelce called Sunday's performance the worst rushing attack he's ever been a part of. Most fans would probably say it's the worst they've ever seen.