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The Linc - LeSean McCoy is the greatest fourth-quarter big-play running back in NFL history

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Philadelphia Eagles news and links for 8/4/2014.

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Eagles training camp practice notes, August 3: Jordan Matthews (yawn) wins the day - Philly.com
The biggest concern with Boykin in his young NFL career is that he is only 5'9, and therefore could struggle to cover bigger receivers. That sentiment will probably never stop. Boykin will be hearing about his size for the rest of his football life. Last season, the occasions in which Boykin was beaten by a bigger receiver -- specifically because the receiver was bigger -- were few and far between. But opposing offenses did try to test him. The Packers, for example, often lined 6'3 Jordy Nelson up in the slot against the Eagles. While Boykin made a number of big plays in Green Bay, the Packers were able to exploit Boykin's height on the play below.

To QB Or Not To QB - Iggles Blitz
The Eagles currently have 4 QBs on the roster. They are Nick Foles, Mark Sanchez, Matt Barkley and GJ Kinne. Seems simple enough. Unless you count Brad Smith. He was a star QB at Missouri and has played some QB in the NFL. And there is rookie LB Marcus Smith. He was a star QB in high school. Urban Meyer once saw him as the next Tim Tebow, if you can believe that. Rookie TE Trey Burton went to Florida to replace Tebow. He did play some QB for the Gators, but ended up getting moved around. Oh yeah, rookie wideout Josh Huff was a QB in high school. Some guy named Chip Kelly brought him to Oregon as an offensive weapon. Huff started at RB, then became a WR. Brandon Boykin split time at QB and CB when he was a prep star. So did Jaylen Watkins. And we can’t forget Lane Johnson. That big son of a gun was a QB in junior college.

Dime defense could give Ryans more breathers this season - Inquirer
DeMeco Ryans played 96 percent of the Eagles' defensive snaps last year. The only reason the linebacker didn't play 99 percent was because the Eagles had blown out the Raiders and Bears and the reserves played in garbage time. Defensive coordinator Bill Davis had talked about limiting Ryans' snaps midway through the season, but except for the few times when the Eagles went with their "dime" package, it never quite happened. It should happen this season.

Running Diary: Eagles Practice Observations - Birds 24/7
Jordan Matthews flashes nice hands on an out-breaking route, reaching up and snagging a Mark Sanchez pass while keeping his feet in bounds. As Matthews sprints upfield, the crowd goes nuts. What I'm convinced of with Matthews: He can get open and catch a lot of balls on short and intermediate routes. What I need to see: That he can get vertical and beat man coverage down the field.

Roob's 25 Points: Cooper, Peters, Polk - CSN Philly
McCoy is already the greatest fourth-quarter big-play running back in NFL history. By far. And he just turned 26. McCoy has seven career TD runs of 40 yards or more in the fourth quarter, and nobody else in NFL history has more than four — Adrian Peterson, Barry Sanders, Antowain Smith, Robert Smith and Fred Taylor each have four. In Eagles history, Brian Westbrook (two) is the only other player with more than one fourth-quarter TD of at least 40 yards. A bunch of guys — from Bryce Brown to Cyril Pinder to Dorsey Levens to Swede Hanson to Ricky Watters — have one. Since Shady entered the league in 2009, there have been 35 total fourth-quarter TD runs of 40 or more yards. Only five players have more than one. McCoy has seven. Or 20 percent. That’s just insane.

Malcolm Jenkins standing out in man-to-man coverage - The 700 Level
When free agency opened in March, the Eagles passed right over two arguably superior talents in Pro Bowlers Jairus Byrd and T.J. Ward and went for Malcolm Jenkins instead. Since nobody could reasonably argue Jenkins was in fact the better player, the focus has been on the many intangibles he brings to the table at the safety position. Jenkins was the best fit for the Eagles’ scheme and the culture head coach Chip Kelly is trying to build. He’s a student of the game with tremendous a tremendous football IQ—a vocal leader who quickly established himself as the so-called quarterback of the secondary. That’s all well and good, but can he actually play?

Eagles Insider Podcast: Mark Sanchez - PE.com
In the first Training Camp episode of the Eagles Insider Podcast, Mark Sanchez discusses life in Philadelphia as well as his amazing offseason travels before the start of camp …

Which colleges have produced the most Pro Football Hall of Famers? - SB Nation
Same as the College Football Hall of Fame: USC and Notre Dame.